God Our Refuge

Let all that I am wait quietly before God,
for my hope is in him.
He alone is my rock and my salvation,
my fortress where I will not be shaken.
My victory and honor come from God alone.
He is my refuge, a rock where no enemy can reach me.
O my people, trust in him at all times.
Pour out your heart to him, for God is our refuge.
(Psalm 62:5–8, NLT)

Psalm 62 is a psalm of confidence, with a central focus on placing trust in the LORD. David wrote Psalm 62 from the perspective of being in mortal danger from his enemies (v3). He felt outnumbered, worn-down, betrayed (v4). Some of the people around him, people he was supposed to be able to trust, were guilty of extortion, stealing, and selfishly hoarding wealth (v10).

The world we live in is cruel. At work, if you’re not crushing people on your way to the top, you’re the one being crushed by someone else. We read and watch news reports about how we’re not safe even in our own homes, whether from outsiders trying to harm us or steal from us, or, God-forbid, even from within, where our own sinful hearts ever tempt us to demand our own way and tear down our spouses, our children, and anyone else who gets in our way.

So where can we go? What can we do? Is there any hope to overcome this cruel world? Is there anywhere, or anyone, where we can turn for strength and refuge?

David says “yes.” Even facing death, we have hope. In our weakest moments, we have strength. In our darkest moments of despair, we have a fortress of refuge. But our refuge isn’t an underground, bat-infested cave, an ice palace in a frozen tundra, or a flying mobile super-fortress. When we are broken, surrounded by enemies, and filled with rage or despair, our refuge is Almighty God.

In verse 5, David says to himself, “let all that I am wait quietly before God.” If you’re like me, you want to see fireworks and explosions. We want to see God working, and we want to see it now. But remember how the LORD spoke to Elijah on Sinai—God wasn’t in the mighty windstorm, or the earthquake, or the great fire. He spoke in the gentle whisper to Elijah, only when Elijah was ready to listen (1 Kings 19:11–13).

David describes God as his rock 3 times; his victory, salvation, fortress, and refuge each 2 times; and hope and honor each 1 time. Victory, salvation, hope, and honor look ahead to the end-result, how God will prevail in all circumstances, and no matter what happens in life, whether by death or rapture, we will all triumph eternally with Him.

Rock, fortress, and refuge capture the never-changing, ever-enduring nature of our God who, in the midst of even the worst circumstances, holds us in his hands, sheltering our souls from the barrage of our enemies. As Paul wrote in Romans 8:38–39:

[N]othing can ever separate us from God’s love. Neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither our fears for today nor our worries about tomorrow—not even the powers of hell can separate us from God’s love. No power in the sky above or in the earth below—indeed, nothing in all creation will ever be able to separate us from the love of God that is revealed in Christ Jesus our Lord.

And this is how David concludes Psalm 62—reflecting on God’s unfailing love. Power and unfailing love belong to the LORD. Therefore, He will surely deliver justice. But not in our timing. In His own, perfect timing.

David began Psalm 62 with a bold proclamation about His confidence in the LORD. But only a few verses later, he had to remind himself to hope in the LORD. So when your life circumstances seem like they can’t get any worse, and when your enemies surround you trying to keep you down, and even your own sinful heart turns against you and everyone you love, turn to the LORD. He is our only hope. He is our only refuge. And His unfailing love is so strong that nothing—not even our own stubborn hearts—can separate us from Him. And where we fail, He will overcome.

Jesus in Psalm 1

Oh, the joys of those who do not
follow the advice of the wicked,
or stand around with sinners,
or join in with mockers.
But they delight in the law of the Lord,
meditating on it day and night.
They are like trees planted along the riverbank,
bearing fruit each season.
Their leaves never wither,
and they prosper in all they do.
But not the wicked!
They are like worthless chaff, scattered by the wind.
They will be condemned at the time of judgment.
Sinners will have no place among the godly.
For the Lord watches over the path of the godly,
but the path of the wicked leads to destruction. (NLT)

Psalm 1 is a tale of two people: the righteous person and the ungodly person. It employs parallelism to compare the behaviors, influences, consequences, and spiritual destinies of each person while holding up a mirror in front of us, inviting us to see how we align with these characters in our own lives.

Much of the Psalm focuses on the righteous person. The righteous person is like a healthy tree growing by a river. The tree receives ample nourishment from the river so it grows, bears fruit, and thrives instead of withering and dying. Likewise, the righteous person receives ample nourishment from the Lord, both in Word and Spirit, growing spiritually, living as a blessing to others, and finding success in living for the Lord as the Lord bestows special favor on the righteous person, helping them to find their happiness in Him.

But the ungodly person is like chaff. Chaff is the outer husk that grows on grain stalks. It is dead and worthless, having no nutritional or economic value. In the ancient world, grain was harvested by tossing it into the air. The wind would blow the lighter chaff away while the heavier seeds would fall to the ground. Similarly, the ungodly person is spiritually dead, living for self, oscillating among influences of ungodly counsel, and impeding God’s work. The Lord withholds special favor from the ungodly person, who does not find happiness in the Lord.

Clearly, Psalm 1 speaks to the dual nature of humanity and the natural consequences that the Lord has ordained for our sources of counsel and lifelong pursuits. But in application, I suggest to you that Psalm 1 is also about Jesus.

Who is this person who always delights in God’s law? Jesus.
Who is this person who never takes counsel from the ungodly? Jesus.
Who is this person who always prospers in everything he does? Jesus.

And in at least three ways, Jesus is the prototype of righteousness living as well as our example for how to find true happiness in the Lord.

1. Jesus is always and only about the Lord’s work. As Jesus replied to the religious leaders of his day John 5:30, 36, “I can do nothing on my own. I judge as God tells me. Therefore, my judgment is just, because I carry out the will of the one who sent me, not my own will. … But I have a greater witness than John—my teachings and my miracles. The Father gave me these works to accomplish, and they prove that he sent me.”

2. Jesus is our example for living and loving. Just prior to the transfiguration, Jesus told his disciples, “If any of you wants to be my follower, you must give up your own way, take up your cross, and follow me” (Matt 16:24). And after washing the disciples’ feet in the upper room, he told them, “I have given you an example to follow. Do as I have done to you. 16 I tell you the truth, slaves are not greater than their master. Nor is the messenger more important than the one who sends the message.” (John 13:15–16).

3. Jesus enables and empowers us to live for God. As Peter explains, “For God called you to do good, even if it means suffering, just as Christ suffered for you. He is your example, and you must follow in his steps. He never sinned, nor ever deceived anyone. He did not retaliate when he was insulted, nor threaten revenge when he suffered. He left his case in the hands of God, who always judges fairly. He personally carried our sins in his body on the cross so that we can be dead to sin and live for what is right. By his wounds you are healed.” (1 Pet 2:21–24).

So by way of application, Jesus is the righteous person. And each of us, apart from Christ, is the ungodly person:

  • We were powerless to save ourselves.
  • But Jesus, God the Son, became a man and died in our place to save us.
  • And now, through the blood of Christ and the power of the Spirit, we can live for God.

The LORD wants to bless us. He wants to find happiness in Him. But that only happens when we listen to His voice and live for Him. Let’s listen to the Word, and live by the Spirit, and find happiness in Him.