Refuge of Our Hope

An original worship song based on Hebrews 6:17-20.

Refuge of Our Hope
Words and music by Tim Northup

This hope we have, an anchor for the soul
A promise, sure, on which we can stand
The veil torn so we may enter in
And come before the presence of the Lord

Where You call us, You go before us
You made a way where we had no way
The Father’s promise, never changing
A sure foundation, the refuge of our hope
A sure foundation, the refuge of our hope

God the Son, seated on the throne
Clothed in flesh, coming to His own
The Captain of salvation, suffering
Unto death, bringing us to glory

Where You call us, You go before us
You made a way where we had no way
The Father’s promise, never changing
A sure foundation, the refuge of our hope
A sure foundation, the refuge of our hope

We draw near to You
Our hearts made pure and true
Our sin covered by the blood
Of Christ the Risen Son

We draw near to You
Our hearts made pure and true
Our sin covered by the blood
Of Christ the Risen Son

Where You call us, You go before us
You made a way where we had no way
The Father’s promise, never changing
A sure foundation, the refuge of our hope
A sure foundation, the refuge of our hope

Where You call us, You go before us
You made a way where we had no way
The Father’s promise, never changing
A sure foundation, the refuge of our hope

A sure foundation, the refuge of our hope
A sure foundation, the refuge of our hope

Undy RunWalk 2019 Fundraiser

undy-runwalk-pic

Colorectal Cancer is a terrible disease that is on the rise in America. I personally have seen a family member and a friend suffer with this disease. Thankfully, if treated early, colorectal cancer is often curable. Still, it takes a tremendous toll on the person diagnosed as well as their loved ones who care for them.

Saturday, March 2nd, I have the opportunity to run to support families affected by colorectal cancer and to fund further research. Will you please join me in supporting the Colorectal Cancer Alliance by donating a couple dollars? You can donate through my Facebook fundraiser here: https://www.facebook.com/donate/567468763765855/10106408852545089/

At the Cross (Joy Made Full)

An original worship song inspired by the hymn At the Cross by Isaac Watts and Ralph Erskine Hudson.

At the Cross (Joy Made Full)
Words and music by Isaac Watts, Ralph E. Hudson, Tim Northup

Who was that man upon the cross
Was He the King, the Saving One
Promised to come, to pay the cross
The sinner’s debt, with His own blood

Was it for crimes that were my own
He hung upon that cross alone
The greatest love, a grace unknown
That He should die the death I owed

At the cross I saw Heaven’s Light
Roll away the burden on my soul
There by faith I received my sight
Looking to the Son, my joy made full
Oh God

His spirit groaned and darkness came
Death carried Him to sin’s domain
But death could not the Son contain
He rose again up from the grave

At the cross I saw Heaven’s Light
Roll away the burden on my soul
There by faith I received my sight
Looking to the Son, my joy made full

At the cross I saw Heaven’s Light
Roll away the burden on my soul
There by faith I received my sight
Looking to the Son, my joy made full

At the cross I saw Heaven’s Light
Roll away the burden on my soul
There by faith I received my sight
Looking to the Son, my joy made full
Oh God

Looking to the Son, my joy made full
Oh God

 

Made In God’s Image

Then God said, “Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness; let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, over the birds of the air, and over the cattle, over all the earth and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.” So God created man in His own image; in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them. (Gen 1:26-27, NKJV)

Every human has within their heart a deep, subconscious longing for eternity. The Scriptures declare that God made each and every human being in His own image—the image of the eternal God. Just a few verses later we read that God intended for the man and woman to live in the Garden, watching over and caring for the animals (Gen 1:28) and cultivating the ground (Gen 2:15), without any contract or conditions for that work to end. And in Genesis 3 we read that when the man and woman sinned against God, only then did God cast them out of that Garden, and one reason is so they could not eat from the tree of life and live forever (Gen 3:22-23).

Science says that humans are animals. They say this based on a combination of observable physical traits, biological drives, social norms, and genetic information. I don’t challenge those observations. But who developed the classifications? Humans. Which means those classifications are only as valid as the finite empirical evidence and soundness of logic from which those classifications are deduced.

Consider the following questions: where in the animal kingdom do we see groups of animals forming councils, writing constitutions, debating laws, and arguing about money? Where in the animal kingdom do we see groups of animals building hospitals, forming rescue services, and pursuing justice and equality? Where in the animal kingdom do we see groups of animals erecting exclusive boundaries, hoarding natural resources, exploiting the labor of others, and killing for any reason other than basic sustenance or debilitating sickness?

All of those things, good or bad, are uniquely human things. None of those things are animal things. Clearly, there is something unique about humanity, something not shared by any other living creature on the planet. What is it that makes humans uniquely human? It is that image of the eternal God written on our hearts, breathed into us by the eternal God Himself (Gen 2:7).

The Gospel of John explains the image of God in terms of light. Concerning Jesus, John wrote,

In Him was life, and the life was the light of men… That was the true Light which gives light to every man coming into the world (John 1:4, 9).

Why did Jesus come? To bring the light into existence? No—the light already existed in Him. Jesus came to bring light to humankind. You see, every human has a darkness residing deep within their heart called sin. Sin is anything we do or don’t do that doesn’t line up with the standard of goodness defined by the attributes and actions of God. Humankind’s sinful rebellion against God began in the Garden when Adam and Eve thought they knew better than God and they rejected the instructions He gave them about what not to eat. And we see the outworking of that sin throughout human history in every evil action ever committed by humans. Humanism says people are basically good. However, history begs to differ, demonstrating time and time again how utter depraved the human race is when left to its own governance.

So, what are we to do with this desperate, unfulfilled longing for eternity? Go to Jesus. God loves us so much that, though we are sinners, Christ died for us (Rom 5:8). And his death on the cross paid the price of atonement for our sins with His blood. Not just once and having to be repeated annually, as the Old Testament rituals required, but once-for-all, as the Old Testament rituals looked forward to, finding their fulfillment in Christ.

For believers, our longing for eternity is satisfied in Jesus Christ. Because, as the Scriptures promise, when we believe in Him, we find life in His name (John 20:31).